Category: Notes to the SCC

A Radical Idea re Voting

The founder of the SCC, Tod Mikuriya, MD, was quick to make use of new technologies, but he didn’t think the new was inherently superior to the old. In fact, he coined a phrase to describe that simplistic attitude: temporal chauvinism. He would have appreciated the following letter published by the NY Times August 10 in response to an op-ed by R. James Woolsey and Brian J. Fox, “To Protect Voting, Use Open-Source.” I make a living finding software security bugs and reporting them to publishers. Because of that experience, I believe that voting is a problem best solved without...

Read More

South African Court Won’t Hear Dr. Donald Abrams

“In London en route to Johannesburg for The Trial of the Plant!” Dr. Donald Abrams emailed on July 24, with an attachment describing the event, which also featured Drs. David Nutt and Ethan Nadelmann. On August 4 Abrams forwarded  this excellent account of why he didn’t get to testify. The good doctor has taken a thousand hits and insults over the decades, yet he retains his equanimity, dignity, and professionalism, and the number of papers he has published in peer-reviewed journals keeps growing. By Kevin Bloom of Daily Maverick For the opening four days of the first truly scientific hearing...

Read More

The Doctor Who Taught Longevity

Dr. Shigeaki Hinoharam  died in Tokyo on July 18 at the age of 105.  It took great restraint not to boldface half the lines in the New York Times obit by Sam Roberts. Extensive excerpts follow: Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, who cautioned against gluttony and early retirement and vigorously championed annual medical checkups, climbing stairs regularly and just having fun — advice that helped make Japan the world leader in longevity — died on July 18 in Tokyo. Dutifully practicing the credo of physician heal thyself, he lived to 105… Dr. Hinohara was born in 1911, when the average Japanese...

Read More

The Speed-up of Radiology

 The “speed-up” is an age-old tactic by employers to get more production out of their workers (without raising wages). When and where unions had some power, speed-ups would generally be met with opposition and/or demands for more pay. Ah, but that was long ago… Here’s a  letter in JAMA by Joseph Henry Hise, MD, July 25, 2017:  I graduated from medical school in 1984 and entered a diagnostic radiology residency. No internship was required for radiology, so I began my medical training without a clinical year. This was long before the implementation of PACS (the picture archiving and computer system); therefore,...

Read More

Fired MMJ User can sue for Handicap Discrimination

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ruled that Cristina Barbuto, fired for using cannabis to treat Crohn’s Disease, has a right to sue for handicap discrimination. Here is the ruling in Barbuto v. Advantage Sales.   The justices make the point that the federal government’s designation of marijuana as a Schedule I substance defies the plain meaning of simple English words: “accepted medical use.” “Nor are we convinced that, as a matter of public policy, we should declare such an accommodation to be per se unreasonable solely out of respect for the Federal law prohibiting the possession of marijuana even...

Read More